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Flowers & Floral Emblems
Flowers & Floral Emblems

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Alaska State Flower (Floral Emblem)

Wild Native Forget-Me-Not

Alaska Flower - Wild Native Forget-Me-Not

(Myosotis alpestris)

Adopted on April 28, 1917.

Alaska's official State flower and floral emblem was a popular representative of the Alaska Territory years before Alaska entered the Union. The Territorial Legislature approved the forget-me-not (Myosotis alpestris,) as the official floral emblem of the Alaska Territory and the Governor signed the legislation into law on April 28, 1917. Ten years later, the wild native forget-me-not, (Myosotis alpestris,) received yet another honor when the Alaska's flag was adopted. The designer of the flag said the blue field, or background, represents Alaska's skies and the forget-me-not. When Alaska became a state, it kept the forget-me-not as its official state flower.

Alaska State Flower: Wild Native Forget-Me-Not

Alaska Flower - Wild Native Forget-Me-Not

Forget me not (Myosotis alpestris) is an Alaska State Flower, it was chosen as State flower in 1949 and produces bright, clear and blue flowers.

The alpine forget-me-not is a perennial that grows 5 to 12 inches high in alpine meadows. The flowers have five connected salviform petals, colored sky blue, that are a quarter to a third of an inch wide. They have a white inner ring and a yellow center. Prefers cold, partial shade or partial sun to full sun; soil should be dry with a humous, moist soil.

The plant can be found in most areas across the state. A member of the borage family (Boraginaceae) its delicate blossoms add color to Alaska's hills and valleys during the brief summer months.

The Forget-Me-Not was designated the official state flower of Alaska because it is thought to be a flower of constancy and perseverance; traits which perfectly characterized Alaska's first intrepid pioneers.

The best time to see the alpine forget-me-not is midsummer, from late June to late July.

  • General: Fibrous-rooted perennial with several or many stems 5-40 cm tall from a short, branched base, with stiff, short to medium length, spreading to somewhat flat hairs throughout.
  • Flowers - April - September. Bright, clear blue, 5 petals in a disc, with little yellow "ring" at the center.
  • Leaves - Basal leaves elliptical and hairy, in a rosette at the bottom, about 2 cm long.
  • Habitat - Rocky mountainous areas, woods, humid fields. Altitudes of 700-2800 m.

One species, Myosotis rupicola, which we shall note again as M. alpestris, loves rocks and stones, and will thrive in a comparatively dry position. It is one of Alaskan Flower Essence Project essences its use is as follows: "Opening our hearts to allow the release of fear and pain held deep in the subconscious; remembering our original innocence. "

Alaska Statutes

The law designating the forget-me-not as the official Alaska state flower is found in Section 50 (State Flower) of the Alaska Statutes - 2004, Title 44, Chapter 09, Section 44-09-050

Alaska Statutes.
Title 44. State Government
Chapter 9. State Seal, Flag, and Emblems
Section 50. State Flower.

The wild native forget-me-not is the state flower and floral emblem.

Taxonomic Hierarchy: Wild Native Forget-Me-Not

Kingdom: Plantae - Plants
    Subkingdom: Tracheobionta - Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta - Seed plants
    Division: Magnoliophyta - Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida - Dicotyledons
    Subclass: Asteridae
Order: Lamiales
Family: Boraginaceae - Borage family
Genus: Myosotis L. - forget-me-not
Species: Myosotis asiatica (Vesterg.) Schischkin & Sergievskaja - Asian forget-me-not

State Flowers
State Floral Emblems
Flowers & Floral Emblems
Find images and a brief history of the flowers representing, usually by legislative action, the state symbols of each of the fifty states.
The term floral emblem, which refers to flowers specifically, is primarily used in Australia and Canada. In the United States, the term state flower is more often used.
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