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New Mexico State Cookie

Biscochito

Bizcochito

Biscochito (bees-ko-CHEE-toh)

Adopted in 1989.

This act made New Mexico the first state to have an official cookie. The New Mexico Legislature adopted the biscochito (bizcochito) as the official state cookie in 1989. This act made New Mexico the first state to have an official state cookie. The biscochito is a small anise-flavored cookie, which was brought to New Mexico by the early Spaniards. The cookie is used during special celebrations, wedding receptions, baptisms, Christmas season, and other holidays. It was chosen to help maintain traditional home-baked cookery.

In 1989, Frances Mitchelle Maldonado, (owner of Enchantment Delights in Albuquerque and was famous for baking her delicious Josecito-Biscochitos) worked on passing New Mexico House Bill 406 declaring the Bizcochito as the official State Cookie.

New Mexico State Cookie: Biscochito

Bizcochito

Bizcochito or biscochito is a crisp lard or butter based cookie flavored with anise and cinnamon. The name is a Spanish diminutive form of Bizcocho. It was developed by residents of New Mexico over the centuries from the first Spanish colonists of what was then known as Santa Fe de Nuevo Mexico. The recipe for making the cookie has been greatly influenced not only by local and indigenous customs, but also by recipes brought to New Mexico by immigrants from other Hispanic countries. It is served during special celebrations, such as wedding receptions, baptisms, and religious holidays (especially during the Christmas season). The cookie is seldom known outside the boundaries of the original Spanish province, although Spanish speakers may recognize the association with Bizcocho, from the name, and may have some idea of what they must be, even if they have not encountered them before.

Biscochito recipe

(Note: There is no "State Recipe" for the State Cookie.)

1 pound pure lard
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
6 cups flour
1/4 cup red wine
2 tsp. anise seed (slightly crushed)
1 cup sugar mixed with 2-3 tsp. cinnamon

Cream lard until fluffy. Add sugar slowly gradually, beating well. Add eggs one at a time beating well. Add anise seed. Mix in flour by hand, using enough wine to make dough soft. Let stand about 10 minutes.

Use cookie press or roll out dough on lightly floured board and cut into squares. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes on ungreased cookie sheets. Remove from sheets while hot and dip top side in sugar/cinnamon mixture.

The recipe donor said, "Cooking sherry or brandy can be used and lard is a must even if the health conscious cringe. The lard is what makes them light. You can't make bizcochitos without lard."

New Mexico Law

The law designating the bizcochito  as the official New Mexico state cookie is found in the 2013 New Mexico Statutes, Article 3, Section 12-4-4 J.

Chapter 12 - Miscellaneous Public Affairs Matters
Article 3 - State Seal, Song and Symbols
Section 12-3-4 - State flower; state bird; state tree; state fish; state animal; state vegetables; state gem; state grass; state fossil; state cookie; state insect; state question; state answer; state nickname; state butterfly; state reptile; state amphibian; state amphibian; state aircraft; state historic railroad; state tie; state necklace.

Universal Citation: NM Stat § 12-3-4 (2013)

12-3-4. State flower; state bird; state tree; state fish; state animal; state vegetables; state gem; state grass; state fossil; state cookie; state insect; state question; state answer; state nickname; state butterfly; state reptile; state amphibian; state aircraft; state historic railroad; state tie; state necklace. (2011)
A. The yucca flower is adopted as the official flower of New Mexico.
B. The chaparral bird, commonly called roadrunner, is adopted as the official bird of New Mexico.
C. The nut pine or pinon tree, scientifically known as Pinus edulis, is adopted as the official tree of New Mexico.
D. The native New Mexico cutthroat trout is adopted as the official fish of New Mexico.
E. The native New Mexico black bear is adopted as the official animal of New Mexico.
F. The chile, the Spanish adaptation of the chilli, and the pinto bean, commonly known as the frijol, are adopted as the official vegetables of New Mexico.
G. The turquoise is adopted as the official gem of New Mexico.
H. The blue grama grass, scientifically known as Bouteloua gracillis, is adopted as the official grass of New Mexico.
I. The coelophysis is adopted as the official fossil of New Mexico.
J. The bizcochito is adopted as the official cookie of New Mexico.
K. The tarantula hawk wasp, scientifically known as Pepsis formosa, is adopted as the official insect of New Mexico.
L. "Red or green?" is adopted as the official question of New Mexico.
M. "Red and green or Christmas" is adopted as the official answer of New Mexico.
N. "The Land of Enchantment" is adopted as the official nickname of New Mexico.
O. The Sandia hairstreak is adopted as the official butterfly of New Mexico.
P. The New Mexico whiptail lizard, scientifically known as Cnemidophorus neomexicanus, is adopted as the official reptile of New Mexico.
Q. The New Mexico spadefoot toad, scientifically known as Spea multiplicata, is adopted as the official amphibian of New Mexico.
R. The hot air balloon is adopted as the official aircraft of New Mexico.
S. The Cumbres and Toltec scenic railroad is adopted as the official historic railroad of New Mexico.
T. The bolo tie is adopted as the official tie of New Mexico.
U. The Native American squash blossom necklace is adopted as the official necklace of New Mexico.
History: Laws 1927, ch. 102, § 1; C.S. 1929, § 129-101; 1941 Comp., § 3-1303; Laws 1949, ch. 142, § 1; 1953 Comp., § 4-14-3; Laws 1955, ch. 245, § 1; 1963, ch. 2, § 1; 1965, ch. 20, § 1; 1967, ch. 51, § 1; 1967, ch. 118, § 1; 1973, ch. 95, § 1; 1981, ch. 123, § 1; 1989, ch. 8, § 1; 1989, ch. 154, § 1; 1999, ch. 266, § 1; 1999, ch. 271, § 1; 2003, ch. 182, § 1; 2005, ch. 4, § 1; 2005, ch. 254, § 1; 2007, ch. 10, § 1; 2007, ch. 179, § 1; 2011, ch. 52, § 1.

 

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