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50 State Quarters
State Shells

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US Official 50 State Quarters Designations

Official  50 State Quarters

Alabama State Quarter

The 50 State Quarters program (Pub.L. 105-124, 111 Stat. 2534, enacted December 1, 1997) was the release of a series of circulating commemorative coins by the United States Mint. Launched in 1999, the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters Program was a 10-year initiative that honored each of the nation's states in the order that they ratified the Constitution or were admitted into the Union. Each quarter was produced for about 10 weeks and will never be produced again. State designs are displayed on the reverse (tails) of the quarters, while the obverse design displays the familiar image of George Washington. But, to accommodate state designs on the reverse, the words "United States of America," "Quarter Dollar," "Liberty," and "In God We Trust" all appear on the obverse.

The 50 State Quarters program was started to support a new generation of coin collectors, and it became the most successful numismatic program in history, with roughly half of the U.S. population collecting the coins, either in a casual manner or as a serious pursuit. The U.S. federal government so far has made additional profits of $3.0 billion from collectors taking the coins out of circulation.

In 2009, the U.S. Mint began issuing quarters under the 2009 District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Program. The Territories Quarter Program was authorized by the passage of a newer legislative act, H.R. 2764. This program features the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Northern Mariana Islands

50 State Quarters

State Quarters

Release - (Statehood) -  Designer

Alabama State Quarter March 17, 2003
(December 14, 1819)
Norman E. Nemeth
Alaska State Quarter August 25, 2008
(January 3, 1959)
Charles L. Vickers
Arizona State Quarter June 2, 2008
(February 14, 1912)
Joseph F. Menna
Arkansas State Quarter October 20, 2003
(June 15, 1836)
John Mercanti
California State Quarter January 31, 2005
(September 9, 1850)
Don Everhart
Colorado State Quarter June 14, 2006
(August 1, 1876)
Norman E. Nemeth
Connecticut State Quarter October 12, 1999
(January 9, 1788)
T. James Ferrell
Delaware State Quarter January 1, 1999
(December 7, 1787)
William Cousins
Florida State Quarter March 29, 2004
(March 3, 1845)
T. James Ferrell
Georgia State Quarter July 19, 1999
(January 2, 1788)
T. James Ferrell
Hawaii State Quarter November 3, 2008
(August 21, 1959)
Don Everhart
Idaho State Quarter June 5, 2007
(July 3, 1890)
Don Everhart
Illinois State Quarter January 2, 2003
(December 3, 1818)
Donna Weaver
Indiana State Quarter August 8, 2002
(December 11, 1816)
Donna Weaver
Iowa State Quarter August 30, 2004
(December 28, 1846)
John Mercanti
Kansas State Quarter August 29, 2005
(January 29, 1861)
Norman E. Nemeth
Kentucky State Quarter October 15, 2001
(June 1, 1792)
T. James Ferrell
Louisiana State Quarter May 30, 2002
(April 30, 1812)
John Mercanti
Maine State Quarter June 2, 2003
(March 15, 1820)
Donna Weaver
Maryland State Quarter March 13, 2000
(April 28, 1788)
Thomas D. Rodgers
Massachusetts State Quarter January 3, 2000
(February 6, 1788)
Thomas D. Rodgers
Michigan State Quarter January 26, 2004
(January 26, 1837)
Donna Weaver
Minnesota State Quarter April 4, 2005
(May 11, 1858)
Charles L. Vickers
Mississippi State Quarter October 15, 2002
(December 10, 1817)
Donna Weaver
Missouri State Quarter August 4, 2003
(August 10, 1821)
Alfred Maletsky
Montana State Quarter January 29, 2007
(November 8, 1889)
Don Everhart
Nebraska State Quarter April 3, 2006
(March 1, 1867)
Charles L. Vickers
Nevada State Quarter January 31, 2006
(October 31, 1864)
Don Everhart
New Hampshire State Quarter August 7, 2000
(June 21, 1788)
William Cousins
New Jersey State Quarter May 17, 1999
(December 18, 1787)
Alfred Maletsky
New Mexico State Quarter April 7, 2008
(January 6, 1912)
Don Everhart
New York State Quarter January 2, 2001
(July 26, 1788)
Alfred Maletsky
North Carolina State Quarter March 12, 2001
(November 21, 1789)
John Mercanti
North Dakota State Quarter August 28, 2006
(November 2, 1889)
Donna Weaver
Ohio State Quarter March 18, 2002
(March 1, 1803)
Donna Weaver
Oklahoma State Quarter January 28, 2008
(November 16, 1907)
Phebe Hemphill
Oregon State Quarter June 6, 2005
(February 14, 1859)
Donna Weaver
Pennsylvania State Quarter March 8, 1999
(December 12, 1787)
John Mercanti
Rhode Island State Quarter May 21, 2001
(May 29, 1790)
Thomas D. Rodgers
South Carolina State Quarter May 22, 2000
(May 23, 1788)
Thomas D. Rodgers
South Dakota State Quarter November 6, 2006
(November 2, 1889)
John Mercanti
Tennessee State Quarter January 2, 2002
(June 1, 1796)
Donna Weaver
Texas State Quarter June 1, 2004
(December 29, 1845)
Norman E. Nemeth
Utah State Quarter November 5, 2007
(January 4, 1896)
Joseph F. Menna
Vermont State Quarter August 6, 2001
(March 4, 1791)
T. James Ferrell
Virginia State Quarter October 16, 2000
(June 25, 1788)
Edgar Z. Steever
Washington State Quarter April 11, 2007
(November 11, 1889)
Charles L. Vickers
West Virginia State Quarter October 14, 2005
(June 20, 1863)
John Mercanti
Wisconsin State Quarter October 25, 2004
(May 29, 1848)
Alfred Maletsky
Wyoming State Quarter September 4, 2007
(July 10, 1890)
Norman E. Nemeth
District of Columbia
District of Columbia Quarter January 26, 2009
(July 16, 1790)
Don Everhart

 50 State Quarter Program

Obverse of the redesigned proof quarter; note the "S" mint mark.

The 50 state quarters were released by the United States Mint every ten weeks, or five each year. They were released in the same order that the states ratified the Constitution. Each quarter's reverse commemorated one of the 50 states with a design emblematic of its unique history, traditions and symbols. Certain design elements, such as state flags, images of living persons, and head-and-shoulder images of deceased persons were prohibited.

The authorizing legislation and Mint procedures gave states a substantial role and considerable discretion in determining the design that would represent their state. The majority of states followed a process by which the governor solicited the state's citizens to submit design concepts and appointed an advisory group to oversee the process. Governors submitted three to five finalist design concepts to the secretary of treasury for approval. Approved designs were returned to the states for selection of a final design.

States usually employed one of two approaches in making this selection. In 33 states, the governor selected the final recommended design, often based on the recommendations of advisory groups and citizens. In the other 17 states, citizens selected the final design through online, telephone, mail or other public votes. US Mint engravers applied all final design concepts approved by the secretary of treasury. The media and public attention surrounding this process and the release of each state's quarter was intense and produced significant publicity for the program.

The State Quarters Program was the most popular commemorative coin program in United States history; the United States Mint has estimated that 147 million Americans have collected state quarters and 3.5 million participated in the selection of state quarter designs.

By the end of 2008, all of the original 50 states quarters had been minted and released. The official total, according to the US Mint, was 34,797,600,000 coins. The average mintage was 695,952,000 coins per state, but ranged between Virginia's 1,594,616,000 to Oklahoma's 416,600,000. Demand was stronger for quarters issued early in the program. This was due to weakening economic conditions in later years and the waning of the initial surge of demand when the program was launched. Another factor was the reassertion of the Treasury Department's opposition to the program. When the director's term ended in 2000, the Treasury proceeded to reduce and finally terminate the most effective elements of the Mint's promotional program despite the high return on investment they earned.

50 State Quarters
State Quarters
The 50 State Quarters program (Pub.L. 105-124, 111 Stat. 2534, enacted December 1, 1997) was the release of a series of circulating commemorative coins by the United States Mint. From 1999 through 2008, it featured each of the 50 U.S. states on unique designs for the reverse of the quarter.
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